A spaceship delivery robot stuck on an icy sidewalk startles passers-by by politely thanking it for its help

A food delivery robot stuck on an icy sidewalk amazes passers-by by politely thanking it for its help

  • The Starship food delivery robot politely thanked the man for helping him on the icy sidewalk
  • Local Graham Smith, from Cambridge, said the “moths” were stuck to the edge of a quay
  • He pushed the robot up and said “thank you have a nice day” to his shock

A small delivery robot has surprised a passerby by “politely thanking” it for its help after it got stuck on an icy sidewalk.

This week a passerby spotted a Starship food delivery robot struggling to find a way to the large icy pier in Cambridge.

Graham Smith of Cherry Hinton in Cambridge immediately came to the robot’s aid at Checkers Close on Tuesday.

He said, “I saw this poor little moth trying to negotiate a high, slippery ledge at Checkers Close earlier today, wheels spinning like crazy.”

Starship's food delivery robot (pictured) got stuck on an icy ledge in Cambridge on Tuesday but was freed by local Graham Smith.  The robot thanked him and wished him a good day

Starship’s food delivery robot (pictured) got stuck on an icy ledge in Cambridge on Tuesday but was freed by local Graham Smith. The robot thanked him and wished him a good day

Starship delivery bots known as 'grocery badgers' have taken over Cambridge to deliver groceries to residents

Starship delivery bots known as ‘grocery badgers’ have taken over Cambridge to deliver groceries to residents

Then Mr. Smith and his partner, Sybil Crisford, gave her an encouraging boost.

Then he surprised them both by saying, “Thank you, have a nice day” before rolling over.

Mr Smith added: ‘Should she have been let out on her own in the weather? She didn’t even have a scarf!

His post about the bot on a local Facebook group has attracted hundreds of likes and dozens of people sharing their concern about the bot’s health.

The Starship bots have enchanted the people of Cambridge, with their polite manners, their singing and their gorgeous light-up flags during the fall after being rolled out in droves across the city.

Robots known as “grocery badgers” have taken over the city of Cambridge to deliver groceries to residents and can be seen lining up outside supermarkets to take orders when needed.

Bots (file photo) use sensors, artificial intelligence, and machine learning to navigate

Bots (file photo) use sensors, artificial intelligence, and machine learning to navigate

The robots use sensors, artificial intelligence and machine learning to navigate, but last week’s icy conditions appeared to have made it difficult for wheels to overcome slippery barriers.

“I think the severe weather test looks like a failure” for the robot, wrote one commenter, but Mr. Smith said he’d give it an “A” for effort.

He also joked that the group should throw a “stop the cruelty to robots” party.

Alan Trim wrote: “Although they are here to replace us, they are great..”

A Starship spokesperson said: ‘Bots make more than 140,000 road crossings every day around the world, at a rate of about one every three seconds.

Most of these crossings are done independently, but in the rare instances assistance is required, bots can be monitored remotely.

β€œIt is also true that bots are not shy every now and then in asking a friendly resident for help, especially in a new area they have recently started mapping.”

What are STARSHIP TECHNOLOGIES delivery robots?

The London-based company was created by Ahti Heinla and Janus Friis at Skype

Slow-moving delivery robots have already been trialled around the world, including in Hamburg, Washington and here in the UK delivering everything from groceries to take-out pizza.

They have logged over 100,000 miles in test mode in over 100 cities in 20 different countries.

Unlike robots designed to resemble humans, the Starship robot operates purely with a large cargo-carrying compartment, about the size of two grocery bags.

Each six-wheeled ‘ground drone’ is completely self-driving.

Workers can drop a pin on a map (like Uber) to show their location and then select the food they want to order.

Each vehicle measures 55 cm (22 in) high and 70 cm (28 in) wide.

It has a secure compartment where parcels with a maximum weight of 10 kg (22 lb) can be transported, and consumers can access them via a link generated by a smartphone app.

They have six wheels and can travel at speeds of up to 4 mph (6.4 kph) per hour.

They travel mainly on sidewalks, can climb onto sidewalks, and work in rain and snow.

The company has already run trials in a number of cities across England, including Camborne, Milton Keynes, Northampton and Bedford.

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