Astronomer Gabriel Brammer created this image using processed raw data that NASA makes available to the public.  The galaxy is not necessarily purple, but the color comes from the wavelengths emitted by the radiation within the galactic molecule

James Webb’s new photo of the “phantom galaxy” has been posted to Twitter

NASA captivated the release of the first images from the world’s James Webb Telescope last week, but another image has surfaced showing the purple spiral arms of an imaginary galaxy 32 million light-years from Earth that some say is strikingly similar to the Doctor Who spiral.

Gabriel BrammerAn astronomer at the Center for Cosmic Dawn at the University of Copenhagen’s Niels Bohr Institute, created an image of the “phantom galaxy” — officially known as NGC 628 or Messier 74 — by analyzing raw data from NASA’s publicly available James Webb Telescope.

Webb captured the image of NGC 628 on July 17 and sent the data back to Earth where it is stored in the Barbara Mikulski Archives for Space Telescopes, (MAST), an archive containing data from 16 NASA telescopes, including current missions such as NASA’s telescopes. The Hubble Space Telescope and Kepler, a space observatory that searches for planets around other stars.

However, the purple vortex arms shown in the image aren’t really that amazing shade of purple, they show that color because the particles that make up the galaxy release emissions of radiation.

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Astronomer Gabriel Brammer created this image using processed raw data that NASA makes available to the public. The galaxy is not necessarily purple, but the color comes from the wavelengths emitted by the radiation within the galactic molecule

Christine Pulliam of the James Webb Telescope (JWST) confirmed to DailyMail.com that the image is from actual web data and explained that while some Webb programs keep the data secret for a year for NASA scientists to analyze, other raw information is publicly posted in an archive for experts to see. .

The purple color comes from the wavelengths emitted by radiation within the galaxy.

These wavelengths fall in the part of the spectrum that is dominated by emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

Brammer wrote: “For a little more context, the purple cast here is actually ‘real’ in the sense that emissions from interstellar cigarette smoke (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules) make the filters used for the blue and red channels brighter in relation to the color. the green. in a tweet.

The archive contains data from 16 NASA telescopes, including current missions such as the Hubble Space Telescope and Kepler, a space observatory that searches for planets around other stars.  Another space enthusiast created a copy of the galaxy with the same data

The archive contains data from 16 NASA telescopes, including current missions such as the Hubble Space Telescope and Kepler, a space observatory that searches for planets around other stars. Another space enthusiast created a copy of the galaxy with the same data

The spiral arms of NGC 628 have been imaged before, but were captured in visible light by the Hubble Space Telescope (pictured)

The spiral arms of NGC 628 have been imaged before, but were captured in visible light by the Hubble Space Telescope (pictured)

The spiral arms of NGC 628 have been imaged before, but were captured in visible light by the Hubble Space Telescope.

Some say the galaxy bears a striking resemblance to the Doctor Who . vortex

Some say the galaxy bears a striking resemblance to the Doctor Who . vortex

Dr Janice Lee, chief scientist at the Gemini Observatory, commented on Brammer’s photo in a tweet: “We drink from the firehouse.

NASA shared the first set of James Webb images with the world on July 12.

Millions of people have followed the US space agency’s live broadcast, waiting in anticipation to see the first official images of deep space.

The exhibit contained a “stellar nursery”, a dying star covered in dust, and a “cosmic dance” among a group of galaxies.

One of the five stunning images released shows a planetary nebula caused by a dying star – a fate that awaits our sun sometime in the distant future.

Roughly half a light-year in diameter and about 2,500 light-years from Earth, the Southern Ring Nebula can be seen in stunning detail never before seen.

There is another image of the Stephan Quintet, which is located in the constellation of Pegasus, which is known as the first compact group of galaxies discovered in 1877.

Four of the five galaxies in the pentagram are locked in a cosmic dance of frequent close encounters.

Sea of ​​Stars: Unprecedented dazzling photos of . have been revealed

Sea of ​​stars: Unprecedented dazzling images of a ‘stellar nursery’, a dying star covered in dust and a ‘cosmic dance’ among a group of galaxies have been revealed by NASA’s new Superspace Telescope. Among them is an image that reveals baby stars in the Carina Nebula (pictured), where ultraviolet rays and stellar winds form huge walls of dust and gas.

One of the images is of Stephan's Quintet, which is located in the constellation of Pegasus and is known as the first compact group of galaxies discovered in 1877.

One of the images is of Stephan’s Quintet, which is located in the constellation of Pegasus and is known as the first compact group of galaxies discovered in 1877.

Another image captures a planetary nebula caused by a dying star - a fate awaiting our sun sometime in the distant future.

Another image captures a planetary nebula caused by a dying star – a fate awaiting our sun sometime in the distant future.

Two cameras aboard Webb have captured the latest image of this planetary nebula, classified as NGC 3132, informally known as the Southern Ring Nebula.  It is about 2500 light years away.  One photo was taken in the near infrared (left) and one in the mid infrared (right)

Two cameras aboard Webb have captured the latest image of this planetary nebula, classified as NGC 3132, informally known as the Southern Ring Nebula. It is about 2500 light years away. One photo was taken in the near infrared (left) and one in the mid infrared (right)

This enormous mosaic is Webb’s largest image to date, covering about one-fifth of the moon’s diameter. It contains more than 150 million pixels and is created from nearly 1,000 separate image files.

NASA said the information provides new insights into how galactic interactions evolve galaxies in the early universe.

Webb also revealed a twinkling image of baby stars in the Carina Nebula, where ultraviolet rays and stellar winds form huge walls of dust and gas.

The “cosmic slopes” of the Carina Nebula – a star-forming region located about 7,600 light-years from Earth in our Milky Way – have been imaged by Hubble.

However, the new show does offer a rare glimpse of stars in their early and rapid stages of formation, including hundreds that were previously completely hidden from our view.


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