Google hopes its new AR glasses could help with a range of different tasks, including how to get from point A to point B or translate a menu

Google launches public test of AR glasses that will use Maps and Translate 10 years after Glass flop

Google is publicly testing augmented reality glasses that will incorporate Maps and Translate into the specs – a decade after Google Glass failed

  • Google is testing new augmented reality glasses with selected testers and its own employees next month
  • The glasses will allow the translation of menus and navigation from point A to point B
  • “These prototypes will include in-lens displays, microphones and cameras, but will have strict limits on what they can do,” the company said.
  • The latest effort comes a decade after Google Glass, which has been widely criticized and not adapted by consumers

Google will begin testing AR glasses a decade after its previous effort in space, dubbed Google Glass, failed.

The tech giant has announced that a small group of select “trusted” testers and company employees will start using the new augmented reality devices next month to see how they impact people’s daily lives. .

Google hopes the AR glasses could help with a range of different tasks, including getting from point A to point B or translating a menu that’s right in front of it into a different language.

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Google hopes its new AR glasses could help with a range of different tasks, including how to get from point A to point B or translate a menu

“These prototypes will include in-lens displays, microphones and cameras, but will have strict limitations on what they can do,” the California-based tech giant said in a blog post.

AR prototypes do not support photography and videography, although image data is used to enable experiences such as translating menus or indicating nearby location.

“It’s early days, and we want to get it right, so we’re taking it slow, with an emphasis on privacy for testers and those around them,” Google Product Manager Juston Payne wrote in the post. blog about the new product.

“These research prototypes look like normal glasses, have an in-lens display, and audio and visual sensors, such as a microphone and camera,” Google said in a testing support page. .

“These prototypes will include in-lens displays, microphones and cameras, but will have strict limits on what they can do,” the California-based tech giant said in a blog post.

“The magic will really come to life when you can use them in the real world without technology getting in your way,” Google CEO Sundar Pichai said during the announcement in May.

Google, owned by Alphabet, which still derives the majority of its revenue from search, first unveiled the AR glasses at its developer conference in May.

Google is locked in an ongoing battle with Apple, Meta and Microsoft to build augmented reality glasses that are actually becoming widely adapted.

“The magic will really come to life when you can use them in the real world without technology getting in your way,” Google CEO Sundar Pichai said during the announcement.

Google’s first effort, Glass, was not adapted by consumers and was criticized by some experts who tried to port it – as such it is no longer available as a retail product .

“I think that was the wrong way to release a product,” a source told The New York Times. “I think a lot of people have seen [the end of Glass] coming. People just weren’t ready to wear that thing on their face. It didn’t normalize as they had expected.

Apple is apparently set to announce a mixed reality headset this year, though that comes years after competitors in the space released their own versions.

The Apple product is rumored to be a wearable “mixed reality” device, which would allow users to see virtual objects superimposed on the real world in front of them.

Mixed reality describes experiences that combine elements of a physical and virtual environment, allowing real and digital elements to coexist and interact.

Meta has announced a new mixed reality headset which is also coming soon.

Google co-founder Sergey Brin wears a pair of Google glasses in San Francisco on February 2.  20, 2013. The effort was widely rejected and is no longer available as a retail product

Google co-founder Sergey Brin wears a pair of Google glasses in San Francisco on February 2. 20, 2013. The effort was widely rejected and is no longer available as a retail product

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