Sue Radford, mum of 22, reveals ‘shock’ when her grandson Chester, 11 months, contracted Strep A

Sue Radford, mother of 22, shared her shock after her grandson was diagnosed with Strep A.

Her daughter Millie, 21, who lives in Morecambe, Lancashire, revealed on Saturday that her son Chester, born in February, has streptococcus A.

Millie, who is Sue and Noel’s third daughter-in-law, claimed a ‘very rude’ doctor misdiagnosed Chester with conjunctivitis on Friday, as she shared a shocking photo of her son looking really bad.

Responding to the news on her Instagram story, Sue raised awareness of the symptoms of the disease.

Sue Radford’s daughter Millie, of Morecambe, took to Instagram on Saturday to share the news that her 11-month-old son, Chester, had Strep A.

She said: ‘It just shook my life early this morning I was woken up by Millie worrying about Chester.

I couldn’t believe what I was seeing – his nose was oozing blood and he looked really bad.

To say we are frustrated by this doctor who saw Chester at midnight on Friday is an understatement given how dangerous Strep A can be.

This could have been much worse. Thank God for the amazing team at RLI (Royal Lancaster Infirmary).

Sue said Chester who was pictured with one of his siblings was diagnosed by a 'very rude' doctor in the middle of the night Friday

Sue said Chester who was pictured with one of his siblings was diagnosed by a ‘very rude’ doctor in the middle of the night Friday

With nosebleeds now a symptom of the virus, Sue told moms and dads to

With nosebleeds now a symptom of the virus, Sue told moms and dads to “follow your instincts” and check on your children.

Millie was absolutely disgusted that the doctors had misdiagnosed Chester after telling her he had conjunctivitis.  Pictured: Sue and her husband, Noel, with an impressive brood during a trip to Disney World in September

Millie was absolutely disgusted that the doctors had misdiagnosed Chester after telling her he had conjunctivitis. Pictured: Sue and husband Noel with their adorable brood during a trip to Disney World in September

With nosebleeds now a symptom of the virus, Su told parents to “follow your instincts” and check on your children.

What are the symptoms of Strep A? How does it spread? Is it the same as scarlet fever? All you need to know about the deadly insect that is ravaging Britain

What is Strep A?

Group A Streptococcus bacteria (group A strep or Strep A) can cause many different types of infections.

The bacteria are commonly found in the throat and skin, and some people don’t develop symptoms.

Infections caused by Strep A range from minor illnesses to serious and potentially fatal diseases.

Skin infections include impetigo, scarlet fever, and strep throat.

While the vast majority of infections are relatively mild, the bacteria sometimes cause a disease called invasive group A streptococcal disease.

What is invasive group streptococcal disease?

Sometimes, invasive group A streptococcus disease is a life-threatening infection in which the bacteria invade parts of the body, such as the blood, deep muscles, or lungs.

Necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome are the most severe forms of invasive disease, but they are rare.

Necrotizing fasciitis is also known as “flesh-eating disease” and can occur if the wound becomes infected.

Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is a rapidly progressing infection that causes hypotension/shock and damage to organs such as the kidneys, liver, and lungs.

This type of toxic shock has a high mortality rate.

Read MAILONLINE’s full FAQ on STREP A.

Millie said she was absolutely disgusted that doctors misdiagnosed Chester after telling her he had conjunctivitis.

“I had to book an ER appointment for him Friday midnight – the doctor was so rude,” she added, writing on her Instagram stories.

‘On the phone with his daughter while my son ‘checked’ everything to say, ‘Yeah it’s just conjunctivitis’ ‘which is true but I said I think he has strep A – he has his throat and there’s a clear red rash on his face. He still refuses to wipe Chester.

On Saturday morning at 5 am, Millie finds Chester’s pillow with her face covered in blood from a nosebleed.

“This nosebleed occurred because he had strep A — it was aggressive in his throat, his face was swollen, his ears were inflamed, and the pressure around his face left him with a nosebleed,” she continued.

Strep A can be life-threatening and lead to scarlet fever, which was common in Victorian times.

Strep A, known medically as Group A Streptococcus or Group A Strep, is a bacterium that causes a range of infections, including strep throat, tonsillitis and impetigo – a skin infection. It can also cause scarlet fever.

The bacteria, which cause no symptoms, can be found in the throat, skin and respiratory tract of infected people.

While the vast majority of Strep A infections are relatively mild, the strep can sometimes lead to rheumatic fever that can be life-threatening if not treated.

The bacteria can, in extremely rare cases, cause a fatal disease called invasive group A streptococcal disease (iGAS).

Read more

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Strep A hits Europe: Health chiefs warn Sharp rise in children becoming seriously ill with mild bug in the wake of Covid

The unusual nodular symptom A that every parent should look out for: A four-year-old girl whose fight against an insect on the tendons of the nation experienced pain in a part of her body before being taken to the hospital


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